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"She had been dragged in the most humiliating of all dusts, the dust reserved for older women who let themselves be approached, on amorous lines, by boys... It had all been pure vanity, all just a wish, in these waning days of hers, still to feel power, still to have the assurance of her beauty and its effects."

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington

"A marriage, she found, with someone of a different breed is fruitful of small rubs..."

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington

"Strange that the vanity which accompanies beauty - excusable, perhaps, when there is such great beauty, or at any rate understandable - should persist after the beauty is gone."

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington

"How could one live, while such things were going on? How could one endure consciousness, except by giving oneself up wholly and forever to helping, and comforting, and at last, at last, perhaps healing?"

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington

"... without it (love), without, anyhow, the capacity for it, people didn't seem to be much good. Dry as old bones, cold as stones, they seemed to become, when love was done; inhuman, indifferent, self-absorbed, numb."

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington

"Life was certainly a queer business - so brief, yet such a lot of it; so substantial, yet in a few years, which behaved like minutes, all scattered and anyhow."

MARY ELIZABETH, ARNIM - Mr Skeffington