Farming

"First, agriculture still has an important niche role in the economy; it still feeds us, with around 93% of Australia's food grown here. Second, the one-third of Australians who live in regional Australia are our fellow citizens, and they should not suffer inferior services because of the expenses of distance. Third, there is our obligation to inhabit the land in order to care for it. Indigenous Australians have always known this, and so do many others who live on the land... The promise of federation was a nation for a continent."

JUDITH, BRETT - the basis for a new compact between city and country

"To be able to donate money to effect change is extremely exciting. I think I'm very determined and persistent. All the things that you need to deliver a successful business and I think these qualities will be useful in the campaign with the Animal Justice Fund. "

JAN, CAMERON -

"Generally I'm very supportive of farmers. I think the wider Australian population is also. The animal justice fund is focusing on factory-farmed animals and where they're being mistreated. "

JAN, CAMERON -

"These are things I'd never seen before, they were very disturbing and they were very compelling to try and do something to change the situation for the animals. Farm animals are providing us with the food to stay alive, so I think we really owe them a decent life while they are alive. "

JAN, CAMERON -

"Be true to yourself, fight for what you believe in, care for others and our land, venture without fear into new territory, and never give up, even in the face of apparently insurmountable odds."

MARGARET, CARROLL - Ordinary People Extraordinary Lives

"I know what obstacles they (rural women) have to overcome to achieve their goals, such as the tyranny of distance, isolation and lack of services - government agencies, closure of financial institutions, limited educational opportunities, and the need to live away from home for medical treatment, often without any family members to support them. Many of our rural women are achieving great things but to them it is in the ordinariness of their day-to-day living. They do not see the obstacles; they see only the challenges and solutions."

ANNE, FINLAYSON -

"It is our spirit which brings to life our whole being; if we are spiritually drained and depleted it is very difficult to remain positive in difficult times. In our contemporary lifestyle material goods are necessary to provide temporary relief but are not sustainable, as they will never be enough."

ANNE, FINLAYSON -

"One thing I've learned from my short time trying to be a farmer is that our farmers have to be the bravest, most optimistic people in the world. To go back to the land year after year, after what nature throws at them and the world economy does to their income, takes a special kind of person. "

SARA, HENDERSON - The Strength In Us All

"People say to us how brave we are, fighting the wilderness, braving the isolation of the Outback. But these are easy opponents, compared with drought. To watch your land shrivel and die, year in and year out, to see beautiful fields turn to dust bowls, to watch your animals starve and die. To suffer all this, only to be then washed away in a flood, your home and your family treasures lost and destroyed. And then to pick up the pieces and start again. The farmers of the South are brave! "

SARA, HENDERSON - From Strength to Strength

"I love the fact I'm working with my hands and producing something, but you've got to be mentally fit to survive it... Rural Victoria is slowly dying, communities are getting smaller, support is getting less. But every day the sun comes up. You just get back into it and do it."

DAVID, JOCHINKE - of country life

"My backyard is a place to recharge and it's a sanctuary as well, because past the green lawn and the green trees is just brown dirt and 40-degree temperature. In the middle of a hot, dry season you wonder how anything can ever be green out here - I guess the lawn reminds me of that."

DAVID, JOCHINKE - of his farm in Murra Warra

"The story of rural women is absent, but it is absent in a way that that is more than just forgotten. It's almost a purposeful discounting.
"

ALANA, JOHNSON -

"We were never going to come back and be happy with the lives our mothers led. We wanted equal partnership with our men, to define the work we wanted to do and the life we wanted to have. Our mothers didn't have any of that.
"

ALANA, JOHNSON -

"Women learnt to be online, to do the marketing, paperwork, accounting, dealing with the GST. They were in the office running modern farm businesses."

ALANA, JOHNSON -

"In our consumerist age we have got away from all that. We have lost track of connecting to our natural world. I meet farmers who would not consider themselves conservationist ? you know, `fertilise the bush, bulldoze a greenie' type of people. These are mates of mine and you go into their sheds they've got every piece of tin that has possibly been on the farm for last 40 years, they've got balls of twine, they capture their own water, they take care of their land because if they don't, they bugger it and destroy their source of income. They are planting trees, they're looking after the land, they are nurturing and understanding of the natural world. They do it because it is the right thing to do, because it makes sense and because it is the right way to go."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"Men and women are like the two wings of a bird. Without one or the other, it cannot fly high. In the world of agriculture, we women don't need to be 'look-alike men', but play our part in nurturing the land and its people. "

CATHY, MCGOWAN - Ordinary People Extraordinary Lives, Margaret Carroll

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we? "

EDGAR'S, MISSION - LiveKind

"The key to a kinder, gentler world starts with you. Choose wisely, act compassionately, tread gently and watch the seeds of your kindness grow."

EDGAR'S, MISSION - LiveKind

"The west was a dead end for me. I could not bear to think that my life would be controlled by drought. No hope of future pasture improvement. We could fine-tune our merino flocks but would lose them in the drought, as sure as night followed day..."

JOHN, MURRAY - Journey to Tobruk, Louise Austin

"The greatest challenge humanity has to face is to make decisions on what is ethical as well as profitable."

LYN, WHITE -

"Living in Australia, we do live in a very, very fortunate society, and in many ways we are cocooned from the broader reality and challenges that both people and animals face internationally... I don't think for a moment that by awakening human hearts to the plight of animals we are not broadly extending compassion to other species and our own species."

LYN, WHITE -