Environment & Sustainability

"Trees are very good friends. Firm friends. My five year old's tree could be relied upon to be there next day, uncritical and protective. And think of trees' contribution to our lives. They provide boats, buildings, paper, furniture and, for clog-wearers, footwear. As well as contributing toothpicks and chopsticks they give little birdies somewhere comfy to sit. Best of all, they help produce breathable air and lock up that naughty carbon. Why is why I am talking to the Greens about giving trees the vote."

PHILLIP, ADAMS - Trees of life

"When you stand looking down on the Freycinet Peninsula, it's a bit like life really - its beauty, ruggedness and ageless power have the ability to overpower, inspire or make you feel as though you've really just come home. Like a life well lived it has a sense of real and tragic history and a genuine hope for an exciting future for yourself and those who will follow. "

DAVID, ANDERSON -

"The Earth and its magnificent gift of life deserve the best efforts of every human. "

AUSTRALIANS FOR, ANIMALS - motto

"Earth Overshoot Day will occur this year (2012). This is the day when we have used up all the resources that our planet produces for the year, when we begin living beyond our ecological means. All resources used for the rest of the year will eat into the Earth's savings. This means that we need 1.4 planets to support us... Our use of nature's resources has risen from using 50% of Earth's resources in 1961 to over 125% in 2007 to more than 130% in 2008. Next year we will use even more."

COOL, AUSTRALIA -

"We need help nature by looking after the planet's ecosystems. We must do something about the three major things that affect our demand on our planet: what we consume, how we produce things and the size of the population."

COOL, AUSTRALIA -

"All business and banking people will tell you that the last thing that you want to do in business or life is eat into your savings; you must live off the interest and hand onto your savings at all costs. So why is it that we are chewing through our Earth's resources (savings) each year? It's official - we are living on credit that we will not be paying back. Just like an overdue loan against our pocket money, the day will come when we will have to clear our debt."

COOL, AUSTRALIA -

"Never was a continent naturally so clean, and made so dirty, as Australia. There was not an animal pest, scarcely a vegetable pest; fools and the old world supplied them all."

RANDOLPH, BEDFORD - Naught to Thirty-three

"Behind us lay the great Antarctic Land; snow peaks rising beyond one another until by distance they dwindled away into insignificancy. The silence and immobility of the scene was impressive; not the slightest animation or vitality anywhere. It was like a mental image of our globe in its primitive state - a spectacle of Chaos. Around is ice and snow and the remnants of internal fires; above, a sinister sky; below the sombre sea; and over all, the silence of the sepulchre!"

LOUIS, BERNACCHI -

"We save paradise by an intense education program where you get people that you can trust to talk sanely about the environment and hope that the message will get through. "

ARTHUR, BOYD -

"First, agriculture still has an important niche role in the economy; it still feeds us, with around 93% of Australia's food grown here. Second, the one-third of Australians who live in regional Australia are our fellow citizens, and they should not suffer inferior services because of the expenses of distance. Third, there is our obligation to inhabit the land in order to care for it. Indigenous Australians have always known this, and so do many others who live on the land... The promise of federation was a nation for a continent."

JUDITH, BRETT - the basis for a new compact between city and country

"What's wrong with leading the way? We've played that role before, after all. We gave the world the secret ballot... that did so much to raise living standards and improve conditions for workers worldwide. We were a leader in extending to women the right to vote. We were barely a nation when we set the bar for bravery and sacrifice by common soldiers in foreign wars. We grew up out of racism and misogyny and homophobia to become a mostly tolerant, successful multicultural society. We did these great things because we know we are in it together. It is our core value as Australians."

GERALDINE, BROOKS - Boyer Lecture 2011

"And at this moment in history, our core value happens to be the raw, aching truth of the human predicament. It may also be the only belief that can save us as a species. A species that will continue to find comfort and delight in the companionship of animals, the miracle of birds, the colours of the corals and the majesty of the forests. We are in it together, on this blue spinning marble in the cold and silent void. And we must act on that belief, if we are going to be able to continue to live a good life here, in this beautiful and fragile country, on this lovely planet, our only home."

GERALDINE, BROOKS - Boyer Lecture 2011

"But that Franklin trip changed me profoundly. As I believe wilderness experience changes everyone. Because it puts us in our place. The human place, which our species inhabited for most of its evolutionary life. That place that shaped our psyches and made us who we are. The place where nature is big and we are small."

GERALDINE, BROOKS -

"So far as we know, Earth is the only planet which supports life, and it is the only planet on which we can survive. Our bodies and our minds are fashioned by it. Our hearts resonate with it. There will be little joy for the human spirit if we destroy the natural fabric of Earth with nothing left to do but go shopping. When we imagine the world a century from now, when we look our great grandchildren in the eye and see them smiling back at us because they know we cared for them, we smile too!"

BOB, BROWN - Global Greens Conference, Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 2008

"Renewable energy is proven technology, the price is dropping, the rest of the world is going that way, that's where our investment should be going as well. "

BOB, BROWN -

"In securing the future of the planet, we secure happiness for ourselves. One of the aims of the Greens is to turn around the tide of pessimism amongst the young people of the world. "

BOB, BROWN -

"We are all born bonded to nature; that's why we put depictions of flowers and forests, rather than bulldozers or log piles, on our walls. "

BOB, BROWN - Memo for a Saner World 2004

"Wilderness has become one of the world's fastest disappearing resources, and it is non-renewable. Yet unlike oil, gold or woodchips, it is essential to the wellbeing of humanity. We are made of it and fashioned by it?our psychological beings resonate with it. "

BOB, BROWN - Endangered: Tasmania's Wild Places, Roger McDonald

"The reality is that if we in this rich, lucky quarter of the planet cannot make a stand for the 30 million other species we share this planet with, let alone our own species, then who can? "

BOB, BROWN - Tasmanian Hansard, Forest Reform Bill, 31 October 1991

"Whereas our common past, out of Africa, saw a global diaspora of humankind, our common future depends on a global coming together and consensus, resulting in a more equitable distribution of the Earth's largesse. When Africa, which gave us the wealth of life, has that debt returned, the world will have come of age. "

BOB, BROWN - Memo for a Saner World 2004

"We are the curators of life on earth. We hold it in the palm of our hand."

HELEN, CALDICOTT -

"Anyone to succeed in the colonies must take with him a quantity of self-reliance, energy and perseverance; this is the best capital a man can have."

ELLEN, CLACY -

"Our human responsibility for animal rights, plant rights, and the rights of the earth to its health and wholeness is self-evident. Whatever our beliefs about the hereafter we are the temporary custodians of the here-and-now, and if we neglect our obligations or abuse our powers then we abrogate any rights to a further share in this planet's delights. "

DENSEY, CLYNE -

"We must start understanding other cultures, such as the Aboriginal culture. They have a harmony with the Earth and from that harmony has grown a certain spirituality. "

IAN, COHEN - The Search for Meaning Caroline Jones

"The whole environment out there is a living, breathing almost conscious being that is saying something to us human beings. The forests can't act but they can inspire us and they inspire people like myself and money others in the conservation movement to act on their behalf. "

IAN, COHEN - The Search for Meaning Caroline Jones

"Civilisation has moved so far from its origin. I think we're part of the earth. The concept of the rainforest being the womb of life is something I believe in - the value system must get back to the environment as it was originally, the magnificence from where we emerged. I believe we carry certain seeds in our genes that connect us to that time..."

IAN, COHEN - The Search for Meaning, Caroline Jones

"I think now we have a very unique opportunity, thanks to the election result, thanks to such a big vote for the Greens, to say you know what, we have to face it. Otherwise this generation will be robbing the next generation of their future, and that's immoral and unethical."

REVEREND TIM, COSTELLO - on climate change

"No matter how far I have traversed around this earth, I have yet to find another location that rivals Australia. Nowhere else on earth can you find such spectacular landscapes, such unique and fascinating animals, and such warm friendly people. This is why I will always call Australia home. "

ADAM, CROPP -

"I have an optimism about what people are willing to do. The greatest force in the world today, believe it or not, are these countless groups of people in every country almost, that are doing things to protect their local environment and to try and protect the earth. "

PETER, CUNDALL -

"Stand in despair anywhere old-growth forest has been clear-felled. All life has been replaced by blackened, poisoned desolation. Animals and birds have either fled or been killed, and baits are laid waiting for those that should return. And in these tortured places, the devastation is brutal and total. And this is what greed looks like. "

PETER, CUNDALL -

"In the long term, it will be the human race that must take responsibility for the development of sustainable life-styles and economies that are not insistent on continuing growth and a throw away society."

DAVID, de KRETSER -

"Today the thing I find myself thinking about the most is our landscape...I think it's something a lot of us take for granted; for many of us Australia is just there but how many of us have really seen it, have seen Kakadu or Kings Canyon? I know I hope to at some stage, to see Uluru at sunset and the ancient art in the Abrakurrie caves. I think it's our landscape which defines our identity and it's what I'm most grateful for."

PROFESSOR MICHAEL, DODSON - Australia of the Year Presentation, 2009

"This is what I love about the Kimberley... wild gorges, fresh water and there's always a chance of a barra taking your lure."

MALCOLM, DOUGLAS -

"Globalisation can provide the route for the development of a sustainable and prosperous planetary society in the next generation, provided that globalisation itself becomes more civilised than it is right now."

PETER, ELLYARD - Designing 2050: Pathways to sustainable prosperity on spaceship earth

"It still feels like home, coming back to Melaleuca, when we come back, however we come. I walk in quite often and it's really nice coming in walking along the track and you gradually get home. But it's exciting flying in as well. I love sort of looking down at the landforms from the plane and the glacial valleys and most gorgeous rivers with the forest all around them."

JANET, FENTON -

"Fantastically, Australia is still the lucky country. We have the flawed but necessary gift of democracy. Currently there is a debate about whether there is racism in Australia. There is racism in every country in the world. Relatively speaking, we are tolerant of one another. We have a large and giving land and, if you haven't seen its beauty, you haven't seen a beauty precious to the earth."

MARTIN, FLANAGAN - The Age, 26 January 2012

"The journey is long, the road is dark and frightening, but together we can reach our destination: the Tasmania of which we all dream, where all are welcome and all prosper, made no longer of lies but truth, built not of rich men's hate but our love for our island and for each other. "

RICHARD, FLANAGAN - Stop the Pulp Mill rally speech, 17 November 2007

"... Regardless of how you see it happening, the end result is that Australia is in the top bracket of parliamentary democracies in the world. That is the gift my generation were handed... that and the natural resources of a large and bountiful land. We all have a duty to care for this country... We need to have a militant regard for this land and its assets. Australian democracy is imperfect. Nonetheless it delivers rights and freedoms that people in countries such as Syria are dying for. We should not take democracy for granted as we took for granted those delicate, beautiful waterways that met the first Europeans and are now sick, exhausted rivers. Australia has problems... The question is whether a significant number of Australians really want to think about them..."

MARTIN, FLANAGAN - The Age, 26 January 2012

"We can only call ourselves Australian if we have a long-term future in this country and that means to live sustainably."

TIM, FLANNERY - at his Australian of the Year Presentation 2007

"It's easy to imagine that us Australians have really made a secure future for ourselves here, but ever since the time the first Europeans arrived we've altered nature so much that we've become an exterminator species - the future eaters."

TIM, FLANNERY -

"I felt Australians needed to come to terms with the fact that they inhabit a continent in the southern oceans whose nearest neighbours are Asia and it has a very distinctive history and a very unique biological history, and that we need to come to terms with that to live sustainably. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"We could go over the cliff. You would hope not. You would hope that people see what needs to be done. It's not rocket science. It's not difficult. It's not even all that costly. It's actually about the way you think about the world. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"Fifty years ago Australia rode on the sheep's back and wool was worth a pound a pound and no one could think beyond that, could they? No one could have imagined this wonderful new economy that we've grown based on other resources. And the same is going to be true for coal, we will make the transition into a new economy and we will be better off..."

TIM, FLANNERY - 1960-2010 Australians of the Year, Wendy Lewis

"Through the activities of Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) I've learned that we can establish a very different kind of relationship with this land - one that permits us to nourish and sustain its biodiversity, its soils and landscapes. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"But I am certain of one thing - if we do not strive to love one another, and to love our planet as much as we love ourselves, then no further progress is possible here on Earth. "

TIM, FLANNERY - Here On Earth an argument for hope

"It's us that decide whether native species will go extinct, or be allowed to thrive. Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC), I believe, allows us to express a new sort of patriotism. Through it we can slowly reappraise what it means to be Australian. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"The world is actually in many key ways improving at the moment. There are still enormous challenges. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"I remain optimistic that we can turn things around, but I think we've got much less time than I thought to ensure our survival. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"I was trying to get people to see that you can't just grow forever and hope that the environment will take care of itself. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"I do feel that the honour comes with a deep obligation, for it speaks eloquently of the desire of Australians to address climate change. We are, on a per capita basis, the worst greenhouse polluters in the world and I don't think any of us want our children asking in future why we didn't give our utmost when it was still possible to influence the course of events."

TIM, FLANNERY - 1960-2010 Australians of the Year, Wendy Lewis

"I was born in Australia as a European and we are still coming to terms with our environment in Australia. It's taken people a long time to realise they're no longer living in Europe and they can no longer live according to the European way of living because to do that is to destroy the environment of Australia. There's a mismatch between the people and their culture, and the land that they live in."

TIM, FLANNERY -

"The pursuit of money is in some ways a very shallow thing and it won't bring happiness unless your mind is prepared to use that money in ways that expand it and satisfy it. So, to me an interest in science and literature and the arts, is all part of just being a full human being, and of course you've got to make some money as well, but our education system it seems to me, should be producing fully rounded human beings who can say, 'I've lead a really satisfying life. I've had all the tools I need to be able to lead a great life,' rather than just, 'I made some money."

TIM, FLANNERY -

"Evolution is on our side. The Earth is the ultimate manifestation of the evolutionary process and it's not one of chaos, it's one of coherence and co-operation. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"Our world is a web of interdependencies woven so tightly it sometimes becomes love."

TIM, FLANNERY -

"We stand at a crossroads, where comprehension of our place in nature - of our true abilities and of our history - is supremely important. We have formed a global civilisation of unprecedented might, driven forward by the power of our minds, a civilisation which is transforming our Earth. We are masters of technology, and of comprehension, but it's what we believe that may, from now on, determine our fate. "

TIM, FLANNERY -

"If we want a long-term future for ourselves and our children, we need to learn about our country, and to nurture it - just as we hope that it will continue to support us. For all these reasons, Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) is vital to me because it allows me to express my love of my country. "

TIM, FLANNERY - Director of Australian Wildlife Conservancy

"Fish are friends not food. "

MICK, FOGG -

"Remember good planets are hard to find. "

MICK, FOGG -

"Development requires modification and transformation of the environment... the planet's capacity to support its people us being irreversibly reduced by the destruction and degradation of the biosphere and the need to understand the problem and take corrective action is becoming urgent."

MALCOLM, FRASER - on conservation March 1980

"We look but we don't see. We hear but we don't listen. The earth is crying. Our planet is dying. "

DR JIM, FRAZIER -

"Global Catch 22: Mankind seems hell bent on being the only species left on earth; the problem is that our survival and continued existence relies on the very biodiversity we destroy. "

DR JIM, FRAZIER -

"The human race is environmentally suicidal. Driven by greed and out of touch with the natural world, we are oblivious to the path of self-destruction we are taking."

DR JIM, FRAZIER -

"The human species can't be intelligent otherwise we'd be living in a world with an unspoiled and unpolluted environment."

DR JIM, FRAZIER -

"The drop in living standards most people would have to accept to reduce climate change significantly would still leave us far better off than previous generations, so it's inexcusable that we find it so hard to renounce material goods."

RAI, GAITA - on climate change

"Economic development over the past two centuries has taken most of humanity from lives that were brutal, ignorant and short, to personal health and security, material comfort and knowledge that were unknown to the elites of the wealthiest and most powerful societies in earlier times."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"The climate change problem is at its heart an ethical problem. It's a problem of income distribution and it's a problem of income distribution with dimensions that we don't usually think about very much."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"The international equity question arises from the costs of climate change itself and mitigation varying greatly across countries. It is affected by the historical responsibility for current greenhouse gas emissions, which countries which were not responsible for what's in the atmosphere now think are very important. Currently rich countries don't think those issues are very important."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"A reduction in emissions matters more than what a country pays for it."

ROSS, GARNAUT - on climate change action

"It is a simple fact of life on earth that there is going to be no successful mitigation of the climate change problem without a truly global effort. All developing companies or all major developing countries have to be part of that and accept substantial constraints on greenhouse gas emissions."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"Carbon capture and storage, its commercial development is going to be the key to the future of coal. If it is successful commercially, then the Australian coal sector will be a centre of prosperity and growth; if it's not successful then it won't be. I think in the long run it's as simple as that."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"It crosses my mind that our generation may leave problems that are simply too hard for human society in the generations that follow. The structures that separate civilisation from disorder are thin and fragile. (But) I am not gloomy by nature so don't presume that the global community will fail the young people."

ROSS, GARNAUT - on climate change action

"A revolution in humanity's use of fossil fuel-based energy would be necessary sooner or later to sustain and to extend modern standards of living. It will be required sooner if we are to hold the risks of climate change to acceptable levels. The costs that we bear in making an early adjustment will bring forward, and reduce for future times, the costs of the inevitable eventual adjustment away from fossil fuels."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"I see myself as a climate change skeptic and a skeptic looks at the evidence and bases conclusions on the evidence rather than on belief. To hold the view that this is not an issue that you need to do something about, to hold the view that it's all a furphy takes belief."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"I have always had, as I know many people have, a singular passion for Australia. I do love the sunburnt country, its ancient landscapes, its exhilarating reaches of sand and sea. "

PETER, GARRETT -

"Our senses convey that all is not well with the natural world."

PETER, GARRETT -

"Climate change is such a huge issue that it requires strong, concerted, consistent and enduring action by governments."

PETER, GARRETT -

"It is now well understood that humans ultimately depend on the health of the planet for their wellbeing."

PETER, GARRETT -

"Humans remain entirely atmosphere dependent, so there is no choice but to respond to extreme climatic behaviour and its many effects."

PETER, GARRETT -

"This is the rollcall of evolution happening in the space of a few generations, the greatest loss of living things that make up our biodiversity since the disappearance of the dinosaurs."

PETER, GARRETT -

"This world has always had global warming and global cooling. What we have never had before is so many people."

GREGORY ALAN, HEIGHES -

"We need to act now. Otherwise the biodiversity that makes Australia so wonderfully unique is going to be lost to us forever."

KRISTY, HINZE -

"Eighty-two percent of Australia's bird species and two thirds of Australia's mammal species can be found on our (Australian Wildlife Conservancy) reserves. We put teams of people on the frontline in the battle against feral animals, wildfires and noxious weeds. Science underpins everything we do."

KRISTY, HINZE -

"No one could fail to be touched by the valley's grandeur, with sunlight glittering on its streams and a deep silence under the whisper of the wind blowing constantly across the plateau."

PHIL, INGAMELLS - of the High Country

"My main concern is that when we create national parks, it is assumed that everything is now sorted forever, that we have preserved something and we now leave it alone. That is totally wrong: we are still the managers of our ecosystems. "

PHIL, INGAMELLS - on using our natural resources

"I am optimistic globally. So many scientists are working frantically on the reparation of our planet. "

STEVE, IRWIN -

"My dad taught me from my youngest childhood memories through these connections with Aboriginal and tribal people that you must always protect people's sacred status, regardless of the past. Every time you lose an animal, it's like losing a brick from the house. Pretty soon the house just falls down, you know? "

BINDI, IRWIN -

"As the world becomes more environmentally aware, I believe that we must as individuals recognize the magnificence of our natural world, and feel a sense of accountability for our actions which affect it. "

BOB, IRWIN -

"I believe our biggest issue is the same biggest issue that the whole world is facing, and that's habitat destruction. "

STEVE, IRWIN -

"Our role is that of guardian and keeper for future generations, not of plunderer and despoiler for our self-indulgent use."

PETER, JARVER -

"Political failure on climate change in Australia has had three direct consequences: inaction on the issue, political mayhem, and the sacrifice of international influence... Leadership matters and political will is required if outcomes are to be changed."

BARRY, JONES -

"Failure to act appears to favour the present but it certainly prejudices the future."

BARRY, JONES -

"A solution will need to be found to the 'two cultures' approach that separates scientists and economists: the environment and the economy are interdependent. Ultimately, Australia can and should choose to set a moral example and work towards a new economic base. Moreover, as the new version of Pascal's wager suggests, action is the low-risk road with the prospect of the highest reward. It is in the national interest to take it."

BARRY, JONES - on climate change

"One is left with the thought that given the way we now abuse the ocean and abuse the climate that we are heading towards our own iceberg, which is looming on the horizon. It's not visible yet but it certainly exists there and it won't be my generation that has to deal with the fact that the world is not bountiful forever, that the ocean and the atmosphere are not free goods to be abused, that will have to feed these vast populations. That will be your generation."

PAUL, KEATING - Speech to accept Honorary Doctorate Macquarie University, 12 April 2012

"All around Australia, and all round the world for that matter, communities that are really starting to build up in their own right taking on some of the challenges around improving our natural environment. They are helping each other to create action, whether it's food gardens or composting, and in their own way taking steps towards a sustainable future. Now all our grandparents did this. They didn't consider themselves greenies or left-wing crazies. They did it because it was the right, proper and sensible thing to do."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"We want to plan a future that can be embraced, not feared and to involve all Australians in the journey."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - on making environmental change a reality

"There is science and research, but there is also communicating a message. There's always in an argument two ends of the scale. I am very much for getting as much information and understanding from the other side, because there is always something good in the other side of an argument. I really don't like this I'm right your wrong fight fight gotcha gotcha gotcha, you know, the way our parliament and media operate. It's a disgrace. I'm very much into solutions. We take the best bits from both sides and we build up in the middle somewhere. I don't try to shove my opinions down people's throats in the social sense or even in a communication sense. I say here is my understanding of where we are; I'd love to hear what you reckon. Yes, good point you make - I will now incorporate that in my understanding. I have learned something from you. Thank you. It's how you talk and how you engage and how you communicate, as much as what you're talking about."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"In our consumerist age we have got away from all that. We have lost track of connecting to our natural world. I meet farmers who would not consider themselves conservationist ? you know, `fertilise the bush, bulldoze a greenie' type of people. These are mates of mine and you go into their sheds they've got every piece of tin that has possibly been on the farm for last 40 years, they've got balls of twine, they capture their own water, they take care of their land because if they don't, they bugger it and destroy their source of income. They are planting trees, they're looking after the land, they are nurturing and understanding of the natural world. They do it because it is the right thing to do, because it makes sense and because it is the right way to go."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"It is the last piece of pristine wilderness on our planet. Our challenge is to preserve it."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - on Antarctica

"If you look at the whole world situation, often people have a response of hopelessness. First people say that it is not happening. I can't do anything. It's not happening; it's all some crazy, left-wing conspiracy. But then you think, OK, well it is happening but it's too big for me to do anything. I can't do anything about it. Then you get to the third stage, once you have sort of absorbed all that, and you say what will I do? Will I just plod along and ignore the plight of our natural world, our life-support system, or will I be someone who took a stand, will I be someone who inspired my kids, my family, my friends, my neighbours, my colleagues at work. It's important to bite off something that you can handle up front."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"But everyone here thinks we can't afford to lead, which I find almost hilarious because I think we're ranked number 47 just behind Azerbaijan in countries doing something about climate change. When Australia was the second country behind New Zealand in 1908 to give women the vote, were people then saying, oh we can't afford to lead, we can't have these women having the vote, that could be scary and civilisation could end? I just don't understand the fear of leading and I don't understand why we can't be leaders. Australia is the best-placed country to make the most out of clean energy. We have the wind, we have the solar, we have the geothermal, we have the wave, we have all these things right on our doorstep and we could export this technology to the world and be a leading country and get rich from it. And wouldn't that be a bloody disaster!"

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"Economists talk about how things are costed. At the moment, we do not cost things properly. All the things that get to us, whether they be products or the table in front of us, there isn't a cost for how this was shipped here, the cost to our environment of chopping the tree down that made this table. All these things are not accounted for. We just have the bare minimum cost and put on a margin and off it goes to the next person who adds their margin until it finally gets to a person at the end of the line. For every bin of rubbish a household produces there are seven bins full of rubbish up the line that we never even see. If we could cost everything properly and if that was something that we had to do and people insisted that it was done, that these externalities were costed ? that's one of the fights we're having in Australia now with this carbon tax; it's an externality and people are polluting our skies and lungs for free and we all have to think about how we might be able to abs"

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"Businessmen ask me; surely this environment stuff has nothing to do with me. And I say well, have you got a bank account? And they say yes. And I say well do you make deposits? Withdrawals? Do you prefer to make deposits or withdrawals? And they say definitely deposits, we want to build up the account, live off the interest and keep building the capital at all costs. So I say okay, so what would you say if we looked at our environment as a bank? And we keep making withdrawal after withdrawal after withdrawal and make very few if any deposits. What's going happen? And they say oh, you'll go broke. So I say well how is that different to how you look at your business. And they say oh, I haven't thought about it like that, maybe there's something I need to think about and I might think about changing my behaviour. We keep making withdrawals from this bank -our environment is our life-support system. We tend to have the economy as sort of a circle in the middle that generates everything w"

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"For every tree we plant, we chop down 10. With the destruction of wetlands around the Murray Darling basin, 80 per cent of birds and 90 per cent of fish have disappeared. The destruction of mangroves, a breeding ground in estuaries, breeding grounds for lots of fish that live in the ocean and rivers and also birds and crabs and everything that goes on in between. So we've got a choice, we can continue to destroy or we can learn to change. The choice is ours."

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"I liked the South-West straightaway... the beautiful scenery, the way the mountains slope down to the sea. And the wildness of it all. "

DENY, KING - King of the Wilderness, Christobel Mattingley

"The slogan used to be 'Populate or perish'. We can now see that it is more like 'Populate and perish'. A sustainable future has to be based on stabilisation of both population and consumption."

IAN, LOWE -

"I need a dose of the natural environment on a regular basis. It balances the bitumen and high rises of Collins Street."

SIMON, McKEON -

"The key to a kinder, gentler world starts with you. Choose wisely, act compassionately, tread gently and watch the seeds of your kindness grow."

EDGAR'S, MISSION - LiveKind

"There has come a time when we can no longer remain silent but must speak up for our country which is being sold, abused, mined, depleted, drained, overworked, over-loved, its plants and animals becoming endangered and exterminated faster than we can renew them. Our country is silent, so we must speak and act to save it."

DI, MORRISSEY - The Silent Country

"Look closely at nature. Every species is a masterpiece, exquisitely adapted to the particular environment in which it has survived. Who are we to destroy or even diminish biodiversity?"

EDWARD, O WILSON -

"I am motivated by a passion for nature. Acknowledging the loss of many of our unique wild places and creatures, it has become my objective as a photographer and publisher to inspire others to champion their protection. I believe we inherited a world in balance and we should be ever vigilant in maintaining that balance."

STEVE, PARISH -

"My theory is that if we don't connect to nature, mentally, physically or spiritually, we're lost. Teaching children to photograph an animal is to understand its behaviour, its habitat and why that habitat must be preserved. In a nation of city dwellers with an ever expanding migrant population, it's crucial to plug people in, give them respect and connection to their natural environment. "

STEVE, PARISH -

"As a naturalist, photographer, publisher and promoter of Australia and its natural history, I have immersed myself in the natural world for the past five decades... However, on my journey, at both a business and personal level, I wrestled with what my contribution should be to the protection of the plants, animals and habitats I was photographing. After all I knew well that human help was required to conserve these places and their wild inhabitants."

STEVE, PARISH - Steve Parish 50 Years Photographing Australia

"Educating others was my primary objective in starting the company. It wasn't just about taking spectacular images, although that is extremely rewarding, too. It was about promoting an understanding for the importance of nature. The first step has to be to light a fire in someone - inspire them to learn more, inspire them to genuinely become one with nature, urge them to connect with it and to celebrate its beauty and diversity. Then let's talk about saving it. "

STEVE, PARISH -

"My dream is that this generation can stand up and make a difference and champion nature. In 1992, I decided that to win the war I needed to focus more on the kids. After all, the adults didn't seem to be listening. The kids are the frontline for the environment now. So today, my work and my company's work is very much focussed on encouraging young people to love nature, to live within the natural world, to question and search and discover, and most importantly, to follow their dreams and live their passion. Kids today are very aware. They do care about what is happening to their inheritance, but we all still have so much to learn about Australian wildlife. The war on wildlife is still far from over. "

STEVE, PARISH -

" It truly was astonishing, the depth and breadth of this land. I really felt a calling to show it to others; to ensure that we not only appreciated what we have down here, down under, but that we were willing to protect it, too. At the time I started Steve Parish Publishing, environmental issues were only just coming to the fore. People were beginning to question what we were doing to nature. I still feel that nature is under attack and it is enormously frustrating that we continue to march hell-bent on destroying what we love and what is necessary for us - both spiritually and materially - as it is for all life forms. "

STEVE, PARISH -

"I realised that, unless I was to become a politician or a researcher, my only real contribution could be to build a publishing enterprise based on sound commercial principles, that would ignite in others a passion for the natural world. I chose to target children of all ages. I soon found I was able to create, produce and sell products that celebrated nature and inspired a personal connection with its beauty and fragility. I knew that my young audience, having made a connection, would grow up believing in the magic of nature. When environmental issues arose, these children, now adults, would lend their voices to make the collective environmental consciousness stronger. This is my drive and has been my reason for being for the last half a century."

STEVE, PARISH - Steve Parish 50 Years Photographing Australia

"As a young person who will inherit the world being created now, I want us to start talking about what needs to happen to prevent this kind of tragedy from occurring again and again. I don't want to live in the world we are previewing right now. We need fundamental change, and it starts with a price on pollution that rids our economy of polluting energy and creates clean energy instead. It starts with increased funding for healthy, renewable energy. It starts with a serious commitment from all political parties to do what is right and significantly reduce Australia's greenhouse gas emissions. I hope some good can come out of this tragedy, and that we use it to have a conversation about what we are going to do this year to make these solutions a reality."

ELLEN, SANDELL - on the Queensland floods

"Finding mechanisms for putting carbon back into landscapes enhances biodiversity. More biodiverse ecosystems store more carbon, more securely and are more resilient to the impacts of climate change."

PROFESSOR WILL, STEFFEN -

"Beautiful is nature, more or less, almost everywhere; but most grand and impressive where the hand of man has not marred and spoilt it: and this spoiling process, how soon it proceeds with advancing civilisation. "

WILLIAM, STRUTT -

"In Norman Lindsay's Magic Pudding, the wonderful koalas Bunyip Bluegum and Uncle Wattlebery represented a new society, one that was rich in the extreme. The Magic Pudding - Albert, represented everything this country had to offer and it appeared it would never run out. The come again, come again pudding, a land of plenty, a land of abundance, a land which had so much promise and still does.

As the Koala Woman, I have come to know that the koalas may run out, that our forests could be depleted and that we all have to work together to save it all. It is not too late, but we must hurry and I am confident that if we do, Australia could lead the world in sustainable practices. I am confident we can do it, together, because I know there are many on this beautiful gorgeous planet of ours that love the bush as much as I do.
"

DEBORAH, TABART - Australian Koala Foundation.

"Children are the next generation and we're going to be the custodians of this world so we need to get involved."

MIA, VISSENJOUX - 13

"Where timber vegetation is ruthlessly destroyed, aridity and its sequence sterility will prevail and the hotter the climate, the more to be dreaded. "

BARON FERDINAND, VON MUELLER -

"Forests, beyond offering us their plainly utilitarian wealth, have to perform vast physiological functions in the great economy of nature, by contributing predominantly in the empire of vegetation to the liberation of oxygen. "

BARON FERDINAND, VON MUELLER -

"Let us regard the forests as an inheritance, given to us by nature, not to be despoiled or devastated, but to be wisely used, reverently honoured and carefully maintained. Let us regard the forests as a gift, entrusted to any of us only for transient care, to be surrendered to posterity as an unimpaired property, increased in riches and augmented in blessings, to pass as a sacred patrimony from generation to generation. "

BARON FERDINAND, VON MUELLER -

"On a feeling and sensitive mind a demolished forest impresses unmingled sadness, whereas its primeval grandeur must inspire anyone to immeasurable delight, who is susceptible to the beauties of nature. "

BARON FERDINAND, VON MUELLER -

"I don't trust humans to look after the planet the way we're going at the moment, no. I think it's going to take a kind of psychic enema to get them concentrating... In my lifetime, everything has become so different. Now, in your lifetime, in my kids' lifetime, it's gonna become different as well. Not just because things happen but because you choose them. And I think the choice has never been more important for humanity because of the huge numbers of people on earth and what we've done to the planet."

ROBYN, WILLIAMS -

" I think things can be completely transformed in an environmentally sensible way, such that we would live in harmony. You know, our cities would look almost rural. You'd have forests on the roof, you'd have no air-conditioning, you'd have designer buildings which would be living things... that would be naturally green. And I think that is a way forward that's perfectly possible."

ROBYN, WILLIAMS -

"The real beneficiaries of Australia's carbon tax package will be people not yet born, all over the world, who will be one step further on a long journey to end global warming. But the cost falls on us, here and now, because it tackles our part in warming. This is a modest start, with modest costs, as part of a loose coalition of nations tackling climate change the world over. If we care for those who come after us, we cannot afford the risk of leaving them a planet where the icecaps are melting, seas are rising, low-lying land is being flooded and today's food bowls are turning into tomorrow's deserts. Let's stop the whingeing and make it work."

TONY, WINDSOR -

"I don't believe there's anything cosmic or divine or morally superior about whales and dolphins or sharks or trees, but I do think that everything that lives is holy and somehow integrated; and on cloudy days I suspect that these extraordinary phenomena, and the hundreds of tiny, modest versions no one hears about, are an ocean, an earth, a Creator, something shaking us by the collar, demanding our attention, our fear, our vigilance, our respect, our help."

TIM, WINTON - A Coastal Memoir

"Hunting and gathering are in my blood. But I've lived long enough to witness a diminution in the seas, and to notice a fragility where once I saw - or assumed - an endless bounty."

TIM, WINTON -

"No-one can do everything for the environment, but every-one can do something to make a better world. "

ARRON, WOOD -

"With a healthy environment all our lives are enriched. Without it our lives are diminished. The environment is and will always be number one. One Life, One World, Our Future. "

ARRON, WOOD -

"We need to believe in a bright, compelling and sustainable future. Fear neither motivates people long-term nor brings out the best in them. Hope is a powerful motivator. "

ARRON, WOOD -

"Making ourselves the solution, rather than part of the problem is our greatest challenge. "

ARRON, WOOD -

"Sustainability is treating ourselves and our environment as if we are to live on this earth forever. "

ARRON, WOOD -