Business & Economics

"All business and banking people will tell you that the last thing that you want to do in business or life is eat into your savings; you must live off the interest and hand onto your savings at all costs. So why is it that we are chewing through our Earth's resources (savings) each year? It's official - we are living on credit that we will not be paying back. Just like an overdue loan against our pocket money, the day will come when we will have to clear our debt."

COOL, AUSTRALIA -

"If you are not hands on, you will be failing. If you have got a rotten apple amongst the trees ? clear it out sooner rather than later. Don't borrow money if you know you can't pay it back. Don't believe for a moment that you can make a fast buck in the shortest possible time. In a partnership, if you haven't got control of 51 per cent (even in your private life) it will fail eventually and it is going to bite physically, mentally, in whichever capacity you are operating in. "

WOLF, BLASS - Five Principles For Success

"I tackled failure positively - again and again until I succeeded. "

WOLF, BLASS -

"When I made many unsuccessful attempts ? and I realised things weren't working ? admit it and carry it with dignity. "

WOLF, BLASS -

"I never thought I was smart... I just kept trying to get smarter. "

WOLF, BLASS -

"10% inspiration and motivation, and 90% perspiration gets you there in the end. "

WOLF, BLASS -

"To accomplish great things one must have a vision, plan and belief to be successful."

WOLF, BLASS -

"Persistence and the will to succeed will be rewarded with success and never, NEVER give up. "

WOLF, BLASS -

"It will take Australia two generations to develop the culture of personal responsibility and the level of philanthropic activity entrenched in the United States. In the US, an amount equivalent to 3.8% of GDP goes to charity. In Australia it is less than 1%."

CHRIS, CADDY -

"Care for your people and your life will be happy."

PERCY, CHRISTMAS -

"I'm a firm believer that to really understand a business takes years, not months. As an investment analyst you think you understand a business from the outside, but the reality is that, once you are inside, you can go on learning for five or ten years."

CHRIS, CORRIGAN -

"I was always acting primarily with shareholder interests in mind. It's also true I've always had a fairly moralistic attitude to business, and would not do anything that I considered improper. As a consequence, I have occasionally pursued issues during my career that other people might have avoided."

CHRIS, CORRIGAN -

"I think the most important CEO task is defining the course that the business will take over the next five or so years. You have to have the ability to see what the business environment might be like a long way out, not just over the coming months. You need to be able to both set a broad direction, and also to take particular decisions along the way that make that broad direction unfold correctly."

CHRIS, CORRIGAN -

"You can't overestimate the need to plan and prepare. In most of the mistakes I've made, there has been this common theme of inadequate planning beforehand. You really can't over-prepare in business!"

CHRIS, CORRIGAN -

"You remove heavy metals out of the ground and you turn that into tables, and houses and bridges and dreams for people in the developing world. I love doing that. "

ANDREW, FORREST -

"This is the welfare generation, and that is incredibly sad. That will be judged in history as being far worse, I believe, than the stolen generation, because we are literally losing thousands and thousands of our indigenous brothers and sisters to the effects of welfare ? drugs, gunja, low morale, alcoholism. I see it everyday and it can stop. The solution is education, training and a guaranteed opportunity. "

ANDREW, FORREST -

"Economic development over the past two centuries has taken most of humanity from lives that were brutal, ignorant and short, to personal health and security, material comfort and knowledge that were unknown to the elites of the wealthiest and most powerful societies in earlier times."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"The international equity question arises from the costs of climate change itself and mitigation varying greatly across countries. It is affected by the historical responsibility for current greenhouse gas emissions, which countries which were not responsible for what's in the atmosphere now think are very important. Currently rich countries don't think those issues are very important."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"Carbon capture and storage, its commercial development is going to be the key to the future of coal. If it is successful commercially, then the Australian coal sector will be a centre of prosperity and growth; if it's not successful then it won't be. I think in the long run it's as simple as that."

ROSS, GARNAUT -

"When people talk about successful retailers and those that are not so successful, the customer determines at the end of the day who is successful and for what reason."

GERRY, HARVEY -

"Businesses are made by people. We've proven time and time again that you can have wonderful shop, and put a bloke in there who's no good, and he'll stuff it up. Put a good bloke in, and it just turns around like that."

GERRY, HARVEY -

"I went to the brink many times. A couple of times I thought "I'm gone.. This is it." But then you would just keep working. I think if you're close to the brink and just make sure that you work twice as hard and put twice as much effort into everything and the people around you and everything, you should come through."

GERRY, HARVEY -

"Basically we get confused a bit about what retail is. It is really just buying things, putting them on a floor and selling them."

GERRY, HARVEY -

" It doesn't matter what business you're in. It is the people who achieve things, not capital, and the great advantage for us is that I think women have always known this. "

JANET, HOLMES A COURT -

"Being a people company, being a people manager is bloody difficult. Like motherhood it takes a huge commitment and is time-consuming, but like motherhood, it is enormously rewarding. "

JANET, HOLMES A COURT -

"It stems from my Australianisms and belief that everyone is a fundamental cog in the wheel."

JANET, HOLMES A COURT -

"I do believe that it is extremely important that each one of us is a participant in life and what's going on around us rather than being a spectator to it and if you do that, if you participate in the world, in your community, your school, your company, or your country, whatever? then you will be useful and hopefully leave the planet a little better."

JANET, HOLMES A COURT -

"We have to shift our emphasis from economic efficiency and materialism towards a sustainable quality of life and to healing of our society, of our people and our ecological systems"

JANET, HOLMES A COURT -

"Don't let anyone say you can't do it."

JOHN, ILHAN -

"Australia has the economic history and corporate profile of an ageing country, not a new one."

BARRY, JONES - Sleepers, Wake!, 1982

"We face an extraordinarily ambiguous future. Technology can be used to promote greater economic equity, more freedom of choice, and participatory democracy. Conversely, it can be used to intensify the worst aspects of a competitive society, to widen the gap between rich and poor, to make democratic goals irrelevant, and institute a technocracy."

BARRY, JONES - Sleepers, Wake!, 1982

"Will Australia have the intelligence, energy or guts to impose democratic and pluralist forms on the new technology, or will its ambiguities all be resolved in favour of the rich, the powerful and the status quo? Our timorous social history, the feeble grasp of complex matters exhibited by too many of our leaders, the low level of intellectual vitality, a lack of national self-confidence, our natural tendency towards bureaucracy, conformity, obedience and fatalism, the mediocrity of the business and academic establishment do not give us much ground for optimism."

BARRY, JONES - Sleepers, Wake!, 1982

" As a small businessperson, you have no greater leverage than the truth."

PAUL, KEATING -

"If one takes pride in one's craft, you won't let a good thing die. Risking it through not pushing hard enough is not a humility. "

PAUL, KEATING -

"You should choose organisations that are going to be flexible and supportive and recognise people are going through different stages in their careers and actually need different sorts of support. "

GAIL, KELLY -

"If I'm watching my son play soccer, that's what I'm doing. If I'm going to a school concert, that's what I'm doing. I turn the phone off. I actively tune into whatever I'm doing. I walk every evening with one of my sons and for that half an hour, 45 minutes, that's what I'm doing."

GAIL, KELLY -

"As a woman, you have to make choices with regard to your life and your career. There is no doubt it's hard. I myself have four children, so life my life is very full. You make choices with regard to how you prioritise, and how you manage your whole life, but again, key to one's success is loving what you do, being very happy in what you do, enjoying working with and through people and prioritising and being pretty focused on what matters. I prioritise my whole life, not just my work life. I don't seek to compartmentalise my life and I make sure I prioritise the absolutely crucial family events, and absolutely crucial activities that surround my four children. "

GAIL, KELLY -

"Economists talk about how things are costed. At the moment, we do not cost things properly. All the things that get to us, whether they be products or the table in front of us, there isn't a cost for how this was shipped here, the cost to our environment of chopping the tree down that made this table. All these things are not accounted for. We just have the bare minimum cost and put on a margin and off it goes to the next person who adds their margin until it finally gets to a person at the end of the line. For every bin of rubbish a household produces there are seven bins full of rubbish up the line that we never even see. If we could cost everything properly and if that was something that we had to do and people insisted that it was done, that these externalities were costed ? that's one of the fights we're having in Australia now with this carbon tax; it's an externality and people are polluting our skies and lungs for free and we all have to think about how we might be able to abs"

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"Businessmen ask me; surely this environment stuff has nothing to do with me. And I say well, have you got a bank account? And they say yes. And I say well do you make deposits? Withdrawals? Do you prefer to make deposits or withdrawals? And they say definitely deposits, we want to build up the account, live off the interest and keep building the capital at all costs. So I say okay, so what would you say if we looked at our environment as a bank? And we keep making withdrawal after withdrawal after withdrawal and make very few if any deposits. What's going happen? And they say oh, you'll go broke. So I say well how is that different to how you look at your business. And they say oh, I haven't thought about it like that, maybe there's something I need to think about and I might think about changing my behaviour. We keep making withdrawals from this bank -our environment is our life-support system. We tend to have the economy as sort of a circle in the middle that generates everything w"

JASON, KIMBERLEY - The Age, 12 September 2011

"My surroundings have always been conducive to achieving what you want and believing in self 100 per cent; not being afraid to stand up and voice your opinion. "

POPPY, KING -

"Australians always want everyone to be average, as if the best thing you can do is fit in. "

POPPY, KING -

"Money is misunderstood. The fact is if you want to be successful the money will follow you. If you are a doctor, something else will follow you. If you are successful there is an accompaniment. If your goal is just to make money you won't succeed. Money is a commodity to use, not to be dictated by. "

FRANK, LOWY -

"For every mountain there is another one. The big question is if you reach the top of the mountain, what then? What do you do then? I suppose you die. "

FRANK, LOWY -

"We are far more effective on the inside looking out than the outside looking in."

HELEN, LYNCH -

"One of the most important responsibilities of leaders in any setting - including business organisations - is to tell us our own story; to explain us to ourselves; to help us weave some meaning and purpose into the fabric of our lives; to illuminate our understanding of where we have come from; to paint word pictures of our future onto which we can project our aspirations."

HUGH, MACKAY -

"I think women who are willing to 'have a go' are much more widely accepted now than ever before. I think if the opportunities aren't obvious, then women who wish to run their own business will find them or make them happen for themselves. "

MIMI, MACPHERSON - Jobs for the Girls

"The Western societies which espouse free market capitalism survive by the pursuit of greed and, in their own way, like Communism, throw into leadership men and women (mostly men) who know how to gain, exert and manipulate power."

DR DAVIS, MCCAUGHEY -

"... what we should be looking for is fresh ideas of how we make moral decisions about our dealings with one another, economic, social, cultural. Economic determinism is an objectionable creed where men and women espouse it in its communist or capitalist form because it treats human beings as economic units and not as responsible persons."

DR DAVIS, MCCAUGHEY -

"Investing intelligently in those of us who are marginalised means fewer people in jail, fewer homeless, fewer unemployed, fewer of us who are forlorn and depressed, fewer people addicted to things that drag us down... Because as we invest in those that do it tough, we will see more Australians taking pride in themselves, having realisable dreams and aspirations and making their own positive contribution to the world's greatest nation."

SIMON, McKEON - The Age, 26 January 2012

"The kind of people I myself represent in parliament; salary earners, shopkeepers, skilled artisans, professional men and women, farmers and so on, these are, in a political and economic sense, the middle class. They are for the most part unorganised and unselfconscious. "

ROBERT, MENZIES -

"A man may be a tough, concentrated, successful moneymaker and never contribute to his country anything more than a horrible example. A manager may be tough and practical, squeezing out, while the going is good, the last ounce of profit and dividend, and may leave behind him an exhausted industry and a legacy of industrial hatred. A tough manager may never look outside his own factory walls or be conscious of his partnership in a wider world. I often wonder what strange cud such men sit chewing when their working days are over, and the accumulating riches of the mind have eluded them."

SIR ROBERT, MENZIES -

"Most newspaper companies still have their heads in the sand, but other media companies are aggressive."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"News - communicating news and ideas, I guess - is my passion. And giving people alternatives so that they have two papers to read and alternative television channels."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"Intelligent media companies strive to provide both intellectual and comedy programs, groundbreaking and reflective articles, art house and popular movies. Not to be open minded in providing a full range of quality media would be a failure to serve the breadth and depth of the communities we live in."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"All forms of government ultimately are not going to succeed in trying to control or censor the Internet."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"There is no room for dictating taste in the diverse and dynamic world of media. To limit taste only limits the role we play for people of all kinds."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"The self-anointed media elite among us believe, somewhat self-servingly, that not only the act, or process of making a profit is positively sinister, but also that the very desire to do so is."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"The world is changing very fast. Big will not beat small anymore. It will be the fast beating the slow."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"Good journalism is good business practice; good business supports great journalism."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"I'm a catalyst for change... You can't be an outsider and be successful over 30 years without leaving a certain amount of scar tissue around the place."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"You can't build a strong corporation with a lot of committees and a board that has to be consulted every turn. You have to be able to make decisions on your own."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"The profit motive is not only fundamental to our ability to reward shareholders and pay employees; it's fundamental to excellent journalism. Far from corrupting the craft, profits enhance it. Expansion drives diversity and diversity protects and strengthens our craft."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"I have been privileged to grow up retaining the love of good journalism, the craft, while learning its business: the dollars and cents. I have learnt that they are not mutually exclusive but integrally self-reliant. Each dependent on the other."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"We all have to expand our capabilities to encompass the changing world, its growing diversity and, indeed, its complexity."

LACHLAN, MURDOCH -

"There is so much media now with the Internet and people, and so easy and so cheap to start a newspaper or start a magazine, there's just millions of voices and people want to be heard."

RUPERT, MURDOCH -

"In a perfect world we don't want to be overly dependent on any single asset or be so dependent on the cycle or where one asset is the bulk of this company."

JAMES, PACKER -

"We need to make sure we have the best people we can in our operations, and that is a constant challenge. There is always room to improve."

JAMES, PACKER -

"I'm a great believer in new technology and I think new technology is very scary for newspaper companies."

JAMES, PACKER -

"The history of media is the market share of advertising dollars has followed - albeit with a lag."

JAMES, PACKER -

"As a naturalist, photographer, publisher and promoter of Australia and its natural history, I have immersed myself in the natural world for the past five decades... However, on my journey, at both a business and personal level, I wrestled with what my contribution should be to the protection of the plants, animals and habitats I was photographing. After all I knew well that human help was required to conserve these places and their wild inhabitants."

STEVE, PARISH - Steve Parish 50 Years Photographing Australia

" It truly was astonishing, the depth and breadth of this land. I really felt a calling to show it to others; to ensure that we not only appreciated what we have down here, down under, but that we were willing to protect it, too. At the time I started Steve Parish Publishing, environmental issues were only just coming to the fore. People were beginning to question what we were doing to nature. I still feel that nature is under attack and it is enormously frustrating that we continue to march hell-bent on destroying what we love and what is necessary for us - both spiritually and materially - as it is for all life forms. "

STEVE, PARISH -

"I realised that, unless I was to become a politician or a researcher, my only real contribution could be to build a publishing enterprise based on sound commercial principles, that would ignite in others a passion for the natural world. I chose to target children of all ages. I soon found I was able to create, produce and sell products that celebrated nature and inspired a personal connection with its beauty and fragility. I knew that my young audience, having made a connection, would grow up believing in the magic of nature. When environmental issues arose, these children, now adults, would lend their voices to make the collective environmental consciousness stronger. This is my drive and has been my reason for being for the last half a century."

STEVE, PARISH - Steve Parish 50 Years Photographing Australia

"If you have a good relationship with your customer, the business process flows that much more smoothly."

RICHARD, PRATT -

"Encourage your people to be committed to a project rather than just be involved in it."

RICHARD, PRATT -

"Successful enterprises are usually led by a proven chief executive who is a competent benevolent dictator."

RICHARD, PRATT -

"One of the responsibilities of a leader is the maintenance of ethical standards within the organisation he or she leads."

JOHN, RALPH -

"Ethical behaviour is not only good business, but is essential for any business that wants to achieve long term success and wants to attract quality people to work for it."

JOHN, RALPH -

"My father's vision was to see the Pilbara developed in a way that would benefit his beloved north, and West Australia and he wanted to see Australia become a stronger economy benefiting from the development of our north. His life was spent pursuing that vision. "

GINA, RINEHART -

"You can't feel the need to be liked in public life, because if you do you will compromise the principles that are so important to the public having confidence in your ethics and integrity."

GRAEME, SAMUEL -

"Each step in life has been another step in an area that was a challenge, that is highly satisfying and that gives you a great sense of pride afterwards."

GRAEME, SAMUEL -

"If you are given a public responsibility, you have to listen, weigh up all the issues, but ultimately you have to form a view of what you genuinely think is in the public interest... put the public interest above the vested interest."

GRAEME, SAMUEL -

"If we are not careful, capitalism will self-destruct. We will destroy it as the companies have no conscience and do not really compete. They are so big they can't go broke, so they simply acquire everything."

DICK, SMITH -

"Australia is an absolutely fantastic country, but the only thing we lack is the ability to work harder."

DICK, SMITH -

"If I could give a message to young Australians, it would be that success comes from being able to place yourself in a position where you have the freedom to do what you want to do. There is a greater chance of this happening in Australia than virtually any other country in the world..."

DICK, SMITH - 1960-2010 Australians of the Year, Wendy Lewis

"To be successful you must surround yourself with capable people and ask lots of advice. "

DICK, SMITH -

"Marx was right when he said capitalism would destroy itself as capitalist would eat capitalist until they became so big they could not compete."

DICK, SMITH -

"Globalization has gone wrong, as it has no rules. Multinationals are almost above the law. They are so huge they are bigger than governments."

DICK, SMITH -

"... the waste, the insane freaks of these money men, the cynicism and egotism of their life... I'll show that they are not brilliant, not romantic, not delightful, not intelligent."

CHRISTINA, STEAD - The House of All Nations

"If all the rich people in the world divided up their money among themselves there wouldn't be enough to go around. "

CHRISTINA, STEAD - House of All Nations

"The City is a machine miraculously organised for extracting gold from the seas, airs, clouds, from barren lands, holds of ships, mines, plantations, cottage hearth-stones, trees and rocks; and he, wretchedly waiting in the exterior halls, could not even get his finger on one tiny, tiny lever."

CHRISTINA, STEAD - The Salzburg Tales

"The most important adage and the only adage is, the customer comes first, whatever the business, the customer comes first."

KERRY, STOKES -

"Ethics or simple honesty is the building blocks upon which our whole society is based, and business is a part of our society, and it's integral to the practice of being able to conduct business, that you have a set of honest standards. And it's much easier to do business with someone when you look them in the eye and say, "This is what we're going to do," and you understand what you each mean, and you can go away and get it done."

KERRY, STOKES -

"The only way of making money is for effort. The only time I've ever lost money is when I've purposely said, "I'm doing this to make money." And I've actually on three occasions lost significant sums. I have made wealth when I've actually made a contribution to something, when I've done something I thought I could do better than somebody else or have done something better than somebody else does it."

KERRY, STOKES -

"Dollars can be a useful measure in the 'game of life' but they are not a symbol of an individual's worth."

BRUCE, THOMSON - Speech to Shepparton Business Achievers Awards 1997

"Becoming wealthy is not a matter of how much you earn, who your parents are, or what you do - it is a matter of managing your money properly."

NOEL, WHITTAKER -

"Life is full of uncertainties. Future investment earnings and interest and inflation rates are not known to anybody. However, I can guarantee you one thing - those who put an investment program in place will have a lot more money when they come to retire than those who never get around to it."

NOEL, WHITTAKER -

"The property boom has made us all feel wealthy, but unfortunately it has lulled many of those nearing retirement into a false sense of security."

NOEL, WHITTAKER -